Sigmar Polke: "ZEITREISE" - Photographs 1966 - 1986. Collection Georg Polke

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Goethestraße 2/3, 10623, Berlin, Germany
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Sigmar Polke: "ZEITREISE" - Photographs 1966 - 1986. Collection Georg Polke

Berlin

Sigmar Polke: "ZEITREISE" - Photographs 1966 - 1986. Collection Georg Polke
to Sat 30 May 2020
Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

Galerie Max Hetzler presents the solo exhibition “ZEITREISE” – Photographs 1966 – 1986. Collection Georg Polke with photographs by Sigmar Polke from the Collection Georg Polke.

Galerie Max Hetzler Berlin Sigmar Polke 1

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In his early photographs, Sigmar Polke proves to be an experimental quick-change artist and alchemist in the darkroom. Most of the photographs have only recently been revealed, characterising Sigmar Polke as a protagonist of the art world and perceptive chronicler with a unique sense of humour. The broad set of photographs points to a life of constant companionship with the camera, and takes its viewer on a journey back in time to the late 60s and 70s up until Polke’s participation in the 1986 Biennale.

In numerous photographs Polke depicts his immediate surroundings: in his home, at first in Düsseldorf, from 1972 onwards at the Gaspelshof in Willich, later on in Cologne, and also of visits to vernissages and of travels. This creates “incredible documents of being present” (Bice Curiger), which bear witness to the photographer’s zest for life and compassion, his alertness and presence. Life and art merge into one another in his images, whereby the Rhenish art scene of the 1970s always tended to stage itself in front of the lens.

Polke defies rules in an extremely carefree way in his photography, constantly searching for ways to escape the triviality of everyday life. By processing his photographs with various technical and photochemical interventions, Polke explores the limits of the medium, leaving the sentiment of photography as a mere form of documentation far behind. He purposely blurs and disrespects exposure time, solarises, erases certain parts of the image and plays with double exposure. Spontaneously manipulating and superposing negatives, on occasion under the influence of hallucinatory substances, contributes to giving his work a particular mystical glow. Through the processing, the motifs become ambiguous and ambivalent, at the same time they are alienated by a surreal picture language and undergo a superelevation, whereby Polke’s photography significantly gains characteristics of his paintings.

“Polke uses deliberately produced ‘mistakes’ and random effects as a kind of catalyst. By doing so he creates humorous images that break from everyday life and endow a mysterious aura to the trivial.” (Dr. Fritz Emslander, Stellvertretender Direktor, Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen, 2018)

Some of the photographs in the Georg Polke Collection derive from the photographic laboratory at the Gaspelshof in Willich, which Sigmar Polke partly left to his son Georg in 1978, while another part was given to Georg Polke by his father in 1986.

For many years the photographs remained fairly unknown and first came into the public eye in 2018 in the exhibition Sigmar Polke. Fotografien 70-80 at the Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen, and were presented the following year in the exhibition Sigmar Polke’s Photographic Infamies at LE BAL, Paris.

Sigmar Polke (1941 – 2010), lived and worked in Düsseldorf, Cologne and Hamburg. Polke’s work was part of solo and group exhibitions in renown institutions, such as Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Siegen (2018); Museum Frieder Burda, Baden-Baden (2017); Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main (2016); Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach (2015); Tate Modern, London; The Museum of Modern Art, New York (both 2014); Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand, São Paulo (2011); Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg (2009); Städtische Galerie, Karlsruhe (2008); J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (2007); The National Museum of Art, Osaka, Japan (2006); Ueno Royal Museum, Tokyo (2005) and Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas (2002), among others. His works are in the collections of the Centre Georges Pompidou – Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris; Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Bilbao; The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The National Museum of Art, Osaka; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam and Tate Modern, London, among others.

Photo: def image. Courtesy of Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin | Paris | London © Georg Polke – VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

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