Maria Lassnig: Ode to New York: Drawings, 1968-1980

, ,
Open: All day, every day

, Online,
Open: All day, every day


Visit    

Maria Lassnig: Ode to New York: Drawings, 1968-1980

Online

Maria Lassnig: Ode to New York: Drawings, 1968-1980
15 Jun -

Petzel presents an online exhibition of works on paper by Austrian artist Maria Lassnig. Developed in close collaboration with the Maria Lassnig Foundation, the exhibition comprises six watercolors and nine pencil drawings depicting Maria Lassnig’s time in New York City from 1968–1980, alongside film footage shot by Lassnig documenting her fascination with the performers, musicians, and pedestrian dancers that she encountered on the pulsating streets of Manhattan.

I am living in a skyscraper for the first time, I’ve always wanted to, on the 13th floor, that’s fairly high up. The view is fairytale-like. I look over to the right at the Empire State Building in the evening, with its 3 upper floors emitting orange, blue, and white light; the Edison with its Gothic window tower and all of the neighboring towers of light; on the left, the two lights of the tallest building in the world, the World Trade Center. The skyscrapers of the Wall Street area and below me, the roofs of East Village. These New York silhouettes form the foreground for a glowing red ball of a sun being immersed in the blue-green evening sky, a sky strewn with innumerable neon slogans that offer a different spectacle on the 4th of July, the fireworks that shoot into the air at different points in Manhattan.

–Maria Lassnig, July 4, 1979

In scenes captured by Lassnig from the parks, rooftops, and windows of 1970s New York, we observe an artist as she revels in the liberation of a new, American landscape. From cityscapes to skylines, abstracted self-portraits, and moments in the famed Chelsea Hotel, Lassnig chronicles both herself and her surroundings in a sweeping ode to New York.

Maria Lassnig
Selbstportrait in New York (Self-Portrait in New York), 1968
Pencil on paper
18 x 12 inches 45.8 x 30.5 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Sarahs Kitten, 1970
Pencil on paper
9.4 x 13.4 inches 23.8 x 34 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Hudson River, 1970
Colored pencil on paper
19 x 24 inches 48.2 x 61 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
N.Y. Selfportrait Verschachtelt (N.Y. Self-Portrait Boxed-Up), 1974
Pencil on paper
18 x 24.1 inches 45.7 x 61.2 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Central Park N.Y., 1975
Pencil on paper
24 x 19 inches 61 x 48.3 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Untitled, 1970–1979
Pencil, watercolor on paper
18 x 23.9 inches 45.6 x 60.7 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Untitled, ca. 1969–1974
Pencil, colored pencil on paper
9.4 x 13.4 inches 23.9 x 34 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

In 1968, at the age of 49, Lassnig moved from her home in Paris to New York City, to be in, as she called it, “the country of strong women." Although well-known in her native Austria, Lassnig was virtually unheard of in the United States and lived, for the next 12 years, in relative anonymity, renting walk-up apartments on the Lower East Side and Soho. According to those who knew her, she felt an affinity with the City; loved its constant activity, dynamism and the sense of freedom it engendered. New York City offered Lassnig a liberation of sorts from the male-dominated art scene of Europe. It gave her the opportunity to be an artist, not simply a female artist—and she worked prolifically, producing paintings, drawings, watercolors, silkscreen prints and animated films, often including hints of Americana in her work. Lassnig’s New York years were an incredibly formative time for the artist, a period in which she further developed her singular “body sensation” or “body awareness” aesthetic of the late 1940s – using sensations of the body as conduits to envision the external world.

Maria Lassnig
Television Selfportrait, 1975
Pencil, felt pen on paper
19 x 24 inches 48.3 x 60.9 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Chelsea Hotel, 1979
Pencil on paper
11 x 14 inches 28 x 35.6 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Chelsea Hotel, 1979
Pencil on paper
11 x 14 inches 28 x 35.5 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Untitled, c. 1979
Watercolor on paper
18.9 x 23.9 inches 47.9 x 60.8 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Untitled, c. 1979
Watercolor on paper
18.9 x 23.9 inches 48 x 60.8 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Untitled, c. 1979
Watercolor on paper
18 x 24.4 inches 45.7 x 61.9 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
New York Steht Kopf (New York on its Head), 1980
Watercolor on paper
16.5 x 23.5 inches 42 x 59.6 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Maria Lassnig
Chelsea Hotel Window, c. 1979
Watercolor, pencil on paper
14 x 11 inches 35.5 x 28 cm
© Maria Lassnig Foundation. Photo: Roland Krauss

contact gallery about this work

Lassnig's self-reflective pencil drawings from this period exemplify how she also turned toward realism identified with portraiture. These drawings reflect how the artistic freedom Lassnig enjoyed in the City allowed her to experiment in other art forms, including film. She even went on to study animated film at the School of Visual Arts for one semester in the spring of 1971, and in 1974 she co-founded the Women/Artist/Filmmakers, Inc., a group of feminist filmmakers.

more to explore:

 
 

By using GalleriesNow.net you agree to our use of cookies to enhance your experience. Close