Mai-Thu: Inventing Tradition – A Vietnamese Painter in France

, ,
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm

18 avenue Matignon, 75008, Paris, France
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm


Visit    

Mai-Thu: Inventing Tradition – A Vietnamese Painter in France

to Sat 8 Oct 2022

Artist: Mai-Thu

18 avenue Matignon, 75008 Mai-Thu: Inventing Tradition – A Vietnamese Painter in France

Tue-Sat 11am-7pm

Artworks

Musicienne à la viole, 1972

Ink and colors on silk
46 x 29.5 x 3.5 cm 18 1/8 x 11 5/8 x 1 3/8 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed upper left. In its original frame made by the artist

contact gallery

Femme arrangeant des fleurs, 1956

Ink and colors on silk
28 x 18 x 1.5 cm 11 x 7 1/8 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed, stamped with the artist's stamp upper right, titled on the back. In the original frame of the artist

contact gallery

Femme aux coussins, 1966

Ink and colors on silk
38.6 x 52.8 x 2 cm 15 1/4 x 20 3/4 x 0 3/4 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed and dated lower right. Titled on the back. In its original frame realized by the artist

contact gallery

Jeune femme sur le chemin au panier de cumquats, 1941

Ink and gouache on silk
46 x 26 cm unframed 18 1/2 x 10 1/2 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed and dated lower left, stamped with the seal of the artist

contact gallery

Portrait de Mme N., 1975

Ink and gouache on silk
46 x 30 cm 18 1/2 x 12 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed and dated lower left, stamped with the seal of the artist

contact gallery

Musicienne à la guitare, 1972

Ink and colors on silk
49.5 x 29.5 x 3.5 cm 19 1/2 x 11 5/8 x 1 3/8 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed upper left. In its original frame made by the artist

contact gallery

Portrait de famille, 1971

Ink and colors on silk
64.5 x 48 cm 25 3/8 x 18 7/8 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed lower right, monogrammed, titled and dated on the back

contact gallery

Le dessin, 1959

Ink and colors on silk
22 x 15 cm 8 5/8 x 5 7/8 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed upper left. In the original frame of the artist

contact gallery

Une partie d’échec, 1961

Ink and colors on silk
55 x 40.1 x 2 cm 21 5/8 x 15 3/4 x 0 3/4 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed upper right

contact gallery

L’orage, 1958

Ink and colors on silk
83 x 65.5 x 3.4 cm (framed) 32 5/8 x 25 3/4 x 1 3/8 in (framed)
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed and dated lower left

contact gallery

Le Coffret à Bijoux, 1960

Ink and gouache on silk in the artist’s original
Frame 75 x 89 cm 29 1/2 x 35 1/2 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed upper right, stamped with the artist's seal

contact gallery

Deux Soeurs, 1961

Ink and gouache on silk in the artist’s original
Frame 43.7 x 31.1 x 2 cm 17 1/2 x 12 1/2 x 1 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed upper left, stamped with the artist's seal

contact gallery

Costume de Fête, 1941

Ink and gouache on silk
60.5 x 41 cm 24 x 16 1/2 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed lower right, stamped with the artist's seal

contact gallery

Les Enfants en prière, 1963

Ink and colors on silk
38.5 x 85.5 cm15 1/2 x 33 1/2 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed lower left. stamped with the artist's seal. In its original frame made by the artist

contact gallery

Costumes de Fête, 1963

Ink and gouache on silk
91 x 41.5 cm 36 x 16 1/2 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed upper right, stamped with the artist's seal. In its original frame made by the artist

contact gallery

Petite Fille en Costume de Fête, 1970

39.4 x 28.1 cm 15 1/2 x 11 1/2 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed lower left, stamped with the artist's seal. In its original frame made by the artist

contact gallery

Petite Fille au livre, 1976

32 x 22.5 cm 12 1/2 x 9 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed upper left, stamped with the artist's seal. In its original frame made by the artist

contact gallery

La Rencontre, 1974

Ink and watercolor on silk
42 x 22 cm 16 1/2 x 8 1/2 in
Courtesy of Almine Rech Photo: Ana Drittanti. Signed lower left, stamped with the artist's seal. its original frame made by the artist

contact gallery

Added to list

Done

Removed

Mai-Thu (1906-1980) is one of the pioneers of modern Vietnamese painting. Born in Indochina during the French Colonization, he studied at the Fine Arts College of Indochina in Hanoi, graduating in its first class in 1930.
In addition to mastering classical Western techniques of drawing and oil painting, he was skilled in figurative painting on silk and in various styles of Chinese painting. Seeking a new artistic expression that would be specifically Vietnamese, he gradually perfected a visual language after permanently settling in France in 1937. Through encounters with master painters of the European tradition, particularly Renaissance painters, Mai-Thu performed a subtle synthesis between Western and Vietnamese motifs. His pared-down images respond to an ideal of gentleness and balance that led him to be considered the most traditional of Vietnamese artists. Yet this universe, constructed from various references, is unique to him. He invented an original style of painting that authentically expresses the essence of Vietnam.

Today, Mai-Thu is considered one of the major figures of modern painting in Vietnam, even though he spent more than half his life in France. His effective absence from the country of his birth and the impossibility of having access to his art until the end of the two wars in Vietnam explain why he was somewhat forgotten by Vietnamese art historians until the late twentieth century. Nor was he recognized in France during his lifetime by the official art world, and he always remained deliberately distant from Parisian avant-garde movements. Nevertheless, he was a recognized artist, and the sale of his paintings constituted his only source of income. Over the course of exhibitions held regularly by gallerists, he was able to develop a faithful clientele of art-lovers who were won over by the brilliance of his silk painting technique and the delicacy of his compositions.

Since the 1990s, Mai-Thu has inspired increasing interest among collectors, including Vietnamese collectors in search of their artistic past. As the artist’s popularity has continued to grow in recent years, his work is familiar to auction-goers but remains unfamiliar to the general public. Rarely exhibited except at auction, and then only briefly, Mai-Thu’s paintings are also held in few museum collections. Today, the Almine Rech Gallery offers a representative group of thirty artworks from the personal collections of members of the artist’s family. Through this selection, covering the period from 1941 to 1976 and reflecting the essential part of his French career, the artist’s favorite themes and the development of his style will be highlighted.

Upon his arrival in France in 1937, Mai-Thu was soon caught up in the chaos of war. He volunteered as a soldier and was demobilized in 1940. The oldest artworks we know of that he made in France, all silk paintings, date from this period. Mai-Thu seems to have decided very early to abandon oil painting, which he practiced alternately with silk painting until 1937, the date of his arrival in France. From that time onward, he decided to emphasize his Asian identity through an artistic means of expression that was practiced by no French artists. He combined silk painting with themes that could stimulate Western interest in a fantasized Orient. Although he excelled in the art of the portrait, he stopped characterizing the faces of his figures. All the women that he depicts have the smooth beauty of a young Vietnamese woman, who tends toward allegory by her lack of unique features. In a similar fashion, the children can be identified by codified hairstyles — short for the boys, in a bob for the girls — and by their slightly rounder faces. The vibration of shadow and light, the perceptible depth seen in the oil paintings made in Vietnam was replaced by a supple, elegant line, sketching simplified forms emphasized by areas of solid color. Keeping in mind traditional Chinese painting, Mai-Thu uses its perspective with two points of view, where the figures in the foreground are seen at eye level, while the line of the horizon is lifted so high that it disappears from the frame. The various planes are stacked one above the other in a slightly archaic manner. Over the years, his style tended to increasing stylization, with the limbs becoming slender and the volume continuing to gradually dissolve.

Mai-Thu remained faithful to his themes, which he constantly repeated with infinite variations. Women are by far his favorite subject. He also evokes certain Vietnamese customs, such as the Lunar New Year festival, when children wear shimmering costumes and the houses are decorated with spring flowers. In the first half of the 1960s, he developed scenes of children playing various games, which met with great success among the public. During the same decade, Mai-Thu created a series of compositions inspired by masterpieces of Western art. La Source, painted in 1966, depicts two bathing women in an allegorical nudity absent from the Asian tradition, while the background opens onto a vast landscape with blue-toned mountains that is reminiscent of the Flemish Primitives. Mai-Thu also transposed into his style several famous paintings in the Louvre such as the Portrait présumé de Gabrielle d’Estrées et de sa sœur la duchesse de Villars and the Grande Odalisque by Ingres.

There was one exception to the timeless, refined Vietnam that Mai-Thu emphasized: his paintings, in a very restrained manner and with the same visual language, evoking the war that tore Vietnam apart for twenty-nine years (1946-1975). In 1963, when the monk Thích Quảng Đức immolated himself during the anti-Buddhist repression carried out by the president of the Republic of Vietnam, he painted Les Enfants en prière as a call for reconciliation. He would never sell this painting, just as he would never exhibit a large oil painting of a mother holding her dead child in front of a devastated plain that is still smoking. This somber Pietà, shown here for the first time, reveals the artist’s personal suffering before the tragedy occurring in his birthplace.

Through his favorite themes — women, children, family, tradition — the exhibition includes some works with many characteristic elements of Mai-Thu’s style, which developed upon his arrival in France and continued to evolve over the years. The artist was also very engaged for Peace as it appears in some paintings produced during the devastating period of Vietnam War until the end of it and the final reunification of North and South Vietnam (La Rencontre, 1974). By leaving his country, he was able, through measured and subtle borrowings from Western and Eastern traditions, to invent a new style that was so perfectly balanced and harmonious that it came to be perceived as traditional.

— Anne Fort, Heritage Conservator
Co-author of the exhibition catalogue Mai-Thu, Echo d’un Vietnam Rêvé, 2021 [Mai-Thu, Echoes of a Dreamed Vietnam, 2021]


Mai-Thu (1906-1980) est l’un des pionniers de la peinture vietnamienne moderne. Né en Indochine pendant la colonisation française, il suit la formation de l’École des Beaux-Arts de l’Indochine de Hanoï dont il sort diplômé de la première promotion en 1930. Maîtrisant les techniques occidentales classiques du dessin et de la peinture à l’huile, il s’est initié à la peinture figurative sur soie et à divers styles de peinture chinoise.
À la recherche d’une expression artistique nouvelle, proprement vietnamienne, c’est à partir de son installation définitive en France en 1937, qu’il met progressivement au point son langage pictural. Au contact des grands maîtres de l’art européen, ceux de la Renaissance en particulier, Mai-Thu opère une synthèse subtile entre emprunts à l’Occident et motifs vietnamiens. Ses évocations épurées obéissent à un idéal de douceur et d’équilibre qui lui vaut d’être considéré comme le plus traditionnel des artistes vietnamiens. Pourtant cet univers, construit à partir de nombreuses références, lui est propre. Il a inventé un style de peinture original qui exprime de manière authentique l’essence du Vietnam.

Mai-Thu est aujourd’hui considéré comme l’une des figures majeures de la peinture moderne du Vietnam, pourtant il a passé plus de la moitié de sa vie en France. Son absence effective de son pays natal et l’impossibilité d’avoir accès à ses œuvres jusqu’à la fin des deux guerres du Vietnam expliquent qu’il a été quelque peu oublié des historiens de l’art vietnamiens jusqu’à la fin du XXème. Il n’a pas non plus été reconnu en France de son vivant par le monde de l’art officiel et s’est toujours tenu délibérément éloigné des avant-gardes parisiennes. Néanmoins, artiste à part entière, la vente de ses tableaux a constitué sa source exclusive de revenus. La popularité de l’artiste n’ayant cessé de croître ces dernières années, son œuvre est familière aux amateurs de ventes aux enchères mais reste méconnue du grand public. Rarement exposées en dehors des ventes aux enchères, les peintures de Mai-Thu ne sont détenues que dans quelques collections de musées.

Depuis les années 1990, Mai-Thu suscite l’intérêt croissant de collectionneurs dont vietnamiens, en quête de leur passé artistique. La cote de l’artiste ne cessant d’augmenter ces dernières années, ses œuvres sont familières aux amateurs d’enchères mais restent encore peu connues du grand public. Rarement exposées mis à part au moment de leur vente, et ce toujours brièvement, les peintures de Mai-Thu sont également peu présentes dans les collections publiques. Aujourd’hui la galerie Almine Rech propose un ensemble représentatif d’une trentaine d’œuvres appartenant aux collections personnelles de membres de la famille de l’artiste. A travers cette sélection, couvrant la période de 1941 à 1976, soit l’essentiel de la carrière française de l’artiste, ses thèmes de prédilection et l’évolution de son style seront mis en avant.

A son arrivée en France en 1937, Mai-Thu est rapidement pris dans le tumulte de la guerre. Engagé volontaire, il est démobilisé en 1940. Les plus anciennes œuvres réalisées en France qui nous soient connues datent de cette époque, toutes sur soie. Mai-Thu semble avoir pris très tôt la décision d’abandonner la peinture à l’huile qu’il pratiquait alternativement avec la peinture sur soie jusqu’en 1937, date de son arrivée en France. Il choisit dès lors de mettre en avant son identité asiatique à travers un mode d’expression qu’aucun artiste français ne pratique. Il conjugue alors à la peinture sur soie des thèmes propres à éveiller l’attrait du public occidental pour un Orient fantasmé. Lui qui excellait dans l’art du portrait renonce désormais à caractériser les visages de ses personnages. Toutes les femmes qu’il met en scène ont la beauté lisse d’une jeune Vietnamienne qui tend à l’allégorie par son absence de singularité. De même les enfants sont identifiables par une coiffure codifiée – courte pour les garçons, au carré pour les filles – et par un visage un peu plus rond. La vibration de l’ombre et de la lumière, les modelés sensibles des huiles réalisées au Vietnam font place à une ligne souple et élégante, dessinant des formes simplifiées soulignées par des aplats de couleur. Se souvenant de la peinture traditionnelle chinoise, Mai-Thu en reprend la perspective à double point de vue où les personnages du premier plan sont vus à hauteur d’œil tandis que la ligne d’horizon est relevée si haut qu’elle en disparaît du cadre. Les différents plans s’étagent les uns au-dessus des autres dans un effet légèrement archaïque. Au fil des ans, son style tendra à une stylisation accrue, les membres devenant filiformes, le volume se dissolvant toujours un peu plus.

Mai-Thu reste fidèle à ses thèmes qu’il reprend sans cesse avec d’infinies variations. La femme est de loin son sujet favori. Il évoque également certaines coutumes vietnamiennes comme la fête du Nouvel An lunaire au cours de laquelle les enfants se parent de costumes chatoyants et les intérieurs, de fleurs printanières. Dans la première moitié des années 1960, il développe les scènes d’enfants, saisis dans toute la variété de leurs jeux, qui rencontrent un grand succès auprès du public. Pendant la même décennie, Mai-Thu propose une série de compositions inspirées par les chefs-d’œuvre de l’art occidental. La Source, peinte en 1966, représente deux baigneuses dans une nudité allégorique inconnue de la tradition asiatique tandis qu’au fond s’ouvre un vaste paysage aux montagnes bleutées, à la manière des primitifs flamands. Mai-Thu transpose également dans son style plusieurs tableaux célèbres du Louvre comme le Portrait présumé de Gabrielle d’Estrées et de sa sœur la duchesse de Villars et la Grande Odalisque d’Ingres.

Le Vietnam intemporel et raffiné que privilégie Mai-Thu admet une exception, celle des tableaux évoquant, tout en retenue et dans le même langage pictural, la guerre qui meurtrit le Vietnam pendant vingt-neuf ans (1946-1975). En 1963, lorsque le moine Thích Quảng Đức s’immole par le feu lors de la répression anti-bouddhiste menée par le président de la République du Vietnam, il peint Les Enfants en prière pour exhorter à la réconciliation. Jamais il ne vendra ce tableau, de même qu’il n’exposera jamais une grande huile représentant une mère tenant son enfant mort sur un fond de plaine dévastée et encore fumante. Cette sombre Pietà, présentée pour la première fois, révèle la souffrance intime de l’artiste face au drame qui se joue dans son pays natal.

A travers les thèmes de la femme, l’enfant, la famille et les traditions, la guerre, cette exposition propose de découvrir les clés fondamentales du style de Mai-Thu élaboré à son arrivée en France. Dès sa formation à l’École des Beaux-Arts de l’Indochine de Hanoï, Mai-Thu est investi, comme ses camarades, du rôle de pionnier de la peinture vietnamienne moderne et se met en quête d’une nouvelle expression visuelle nationale. C’est en quittant son pays qu’il parvient, par des emprunts mesurés et subtils aux traditions occidentales et orientales, à inventer un style nouveau, si parfaitement équilibré et harmonieux qu’il en vient à être perçu comme traditionnel.

— Anne Fort, Conservatrice du Patrimoine
Co-auteur du catalogue d’exposition Mai-Thu, écho d’un Vietnam rêvé, 2021 [Mai-Thu, Echoes of a Dreamed Vietnam, 2021]

Installation views of Mai-Thu - Inventing Tradition – A Vietnamese Painter in France September 7 - October 8, 2022, Almine Rech Matignon


more to explore:

 
 

By using GalleriesNow.net you agree to our use of cookies to enhance your experience. Close