Lorna Simpson: Give Me Some Moments

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Lorna Simpson: Give Me Some Moments

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Lorna Simpson: Give Me Some Moments
2 May -

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‘the notion of fragmentation, especially of the body, is prevalent in our culture, and it’s reflected in my works. We’re fragmented not only in terms of how society regulates our bodies but in the way we think about ourselves.’ - Lorna Simpson

Give Me Some Moments

‘Give Me Some Moments’ follows the artist’s critically acclaimed 2019 exhibition ‘Darkening’ at Hauser & Wirth’s 22nd Street gallery in New York. In 2019, Simpson was awarded the esteemed J. Paul Getty Medal, honoring her extraordinary contribution to practice, understanding, and support of the arts.

Lorna Simpson
Walk with me, 2020
Collage on paper
74.6 x 57.2 cm / 29 3/8 x 22 1/2 in
© Lorna Simpson. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: James Wang

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Lorna Simpson
Solar Glare, 2020
Collage on paper
45.6 x 34.8 cm / 17 15/16 x 13 11/16 in
© Lorna Simpson. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: James Wang

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Lorna Simpson
Lyra night sky styled in NYC, 2020
Collage on paper
45.6 x 34.8 cm / 17 15/16 x 13 11/16 in
© Lorna Simpson. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: James Wang

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The new collages feature a series of female and male protagonists, often the focal point of the compositions, who Simpson splices with architectural features, animals, and natural elements to create scenarios that are at once poetic and arresting.

Lorna Simpson
*Adornment, 2020
Found photograph and collage on paper; 7 framed collages
49.2 x 38.1 cm / 19 3/8 x 15 in. Installation dimensions variable
© Lorna Simpson. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: James Wang

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In these collages, Simpson uses the devices of extreme cropping and close-ups to hone in on sections of the bodies portrayed. As she explains, ‘the notion of fragmentation, especially of the body, is prevalent in our culture, and it’s reflected in my works. We’re fragmented not only in terms of how society regulates our bodies but in the way we think about ourselves.’

Lorna Simpson
Flames, 2019
Found photograph and collage on paper; 2 framed collages
48.3 x 36 cm / 19 x 14 3/16 in. 
Installation dimensions variable
© Lorna Simpson. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: James Wang

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In ‘Flames’ (2019), Simpson forefronts women’s heads and inserts scenes of burning buildings in place of advertised coiffed wigs, while in ‘California’ (2019) she intertwines geological source material from a 1931 textbook with domestic scenery, encouraging new narratives to emerge from the unexpected settings.

Lorna Simpson
Solar, 2019
Collage on paper; 3 framed collages
46.7 x 38 cm / 18 3/8 x 15 in. Installation dimensions variable
© Lorna Simpson. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: James Wang

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Lorna Simpson
Construction, 2020
Collage on paper
56.4 x 43.3 cm / 22 3/16 x 17 1/16 in
© Lorna Simpson. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: James Wang

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Lorna Simpson
California, 2019
Found photograph and collage on paper
56.5 x 41.8 cm / 22 1/4 x 16 7/16 in
© Lorna Simpson. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: James Wang

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While under quarantine, Simpson has continued to engage the analog nature of the collage process, directly cutting and pasting from Ebony magazines, resulting in three new surreal portraits that are featured in this exhibition: ‘Solar Glare’ (2020), ‘Walk with Me’ (2020), and ‘Lyra night sky styled in NYC’ (2020).

About the artist

Born in Brooklyn, Lorna Simpson came to prominence in the 1980s with her pioneering approach to conceptual photography. Simpson’s early work – particularly her striking juxtapositions of text and staged images – raised questions about the nature of representation, identity, gender, race and history that continue to drive the artist’s expanding and multi-disciplinary practice today.

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