Gordon Cheung: Arrow to Heaven

, ,
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm

18 avenue Matignon, 75008, Paris, France
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm


Visit    

Gordon Cheung: Arrow to Heaven

to Sat 30 Jul 2022

Artist : Gordon Cheung

18 avenue Matignon, 75008 Gordon Cheung: Arrow to Heaven

Tue-Sat 11am-7pm


version française ici

Almine Rech presents ‘Arrow to Heaven’, a selection of works by artist Gordon Cheung.

Artworks

Arrow to Heaven, 2022

Financial Times newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic, and sand on linen
150 x 200 x 3 cm / 59 1/2 x 78 1/2 x 1 1/2 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Heavenly Lake, 2022

Financial Times newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic, and sand on linen
150 x 200 x 3 cm / 59 1/2 x 78 1/2 x 1 1/2 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Heavens Collide, 2022

Financial Times newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic, and sand on linen
150 x 200 x 3 cm / 59 1/2 x 78 1/2 x 1 1/2 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Gardens of Perfect Brightness, 2022

Financial Times newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic, and sand on linen
200 x 150 x 3 cm / 78 1/2 x 59 1/2 x 1 1/2 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Augury of Beijing, 2022

Financial Times newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic, and sand on linen
82 x 57 cm / 32 1/2 x 22 1/2 in
Titled, signed and dated on the verso. Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Augury of Wuhan, 2022

Financial Times newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic, and sand on linen
82 x 57 cm / 32 1/2 x 22 1/2 in
Titled, signed and dated on the back. Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Augury of Hong Kong, 2022

Financial Times newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic, and sand on linen
82 x 57 x 5 cm / 32 1/2 x 22 1/2 x 2 in
Titled, signed and dated on the back. Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Augury of Shenzhen, 2022

Financial Times newspaper, archival inkjet, acrylic, and sand on linen
82 x 57 cm / 32 1/2 x 22 1/2 in
Titled, signed and dated on the back. Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Window #21, 2018

Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive
98 x 74.5 cm / 38 1/2 x 29 1/2 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Window E #53, 2020

Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive
53 x 71.5 x 2.5 cm / 21 x 28 1/2 x 1 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Window F #54, 2020

Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive
76 x 55 x 2.5 cm / 30 x 21 1/2 x 1 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Window J #58, 2020

Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive
54.5 x 54 x 2 cm / 21 1/2 x 21 1/2 x 1 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Window K #59, 2020

Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive
61 x 46.5 x 2 cm / 24 1/2 x 18 1/2 x 1 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Window M #61, 2020

Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive
69.5 x 49 x 2 cm / 27 1/2 x 19 1/2 x 1 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Window P #64, 2020

Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive
73 x 53.5 x 2 cm / 28 1/2 x 21 1/2 x 1in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Window Q #65, 2020

Financial Times newspaper, bamboo and adhesive
50.5 x 51.5 x 2 cm / 20 x 20 1/2 x 1 in
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Gordon Cheung Studios

contact gallery

Added to list

Done

Removed

Almine Rech Matignon Gordon Cheung 1

Almine Rech Matignon Gordon Cheung 6

Almine Rech Matignon Gordon Cheung 2

Almine Rech Matignon Gordon Cheung 3

Almine Rech Matignon Gordon Cheung 4

Almine Rech Matignon Gordon Cheung 5

Almine Rech Matignon Gordon Cheung 7

Almine Rech Matignon Gordon Cheung 8

Cheung’s first solo at Almine Rech takes as its historical marker, the Second Opium War, which lasted from 1856-1860. It consists of a number of new paintings and sculptures which further explores his interest in understanding the development of Modern China and continues his interests in revealing these lesser known histories of China and its invasion by the West. The heaven in the title refers to the city of Tianjian, which is translated as Heaven’s boundary or Ford and was the location where the Treaty of Tianjian was signed signalling the end of the Second Opium War.

The show is a study of confluences, a look at an intertwined history between two largely contrasting cultures, religions and philosophies at a historical juncture of huge acceleration on one side, charging headlong into Modernism. Cheung’s paintings are a multi-layered account of human activity and history and his interest stems from his upbringing as a British born Chinese and his desire to understand his own roots. His work speaks to a wide range of influences, from romanticists such as Caspar David Friedrich to sculptures influenced by Chinese Window designs. However, Cheung’s paintings are anything but polite, the acidic colour palettes (somewhat reminiscent of the swirling pyrotechnical allegories of the Victorian painter John Martin) suggest chemical interactions of a world ravaged by human industry, perhaps even on the brink of anthropogenic chaos or the aftermath of a nuclear war.

The artist creates his signature aesthetic using tools and techniques thoroughly informed by the modern world. He sources photos from image databases and Google Earth which he then prints onto the pink hued listings of the Financial Times newspaper. This uncommon technique creates a bedrock where the records of daily economic activity are impregnated, but at the same time interweaving further readings. Layer by layer he builds upon these endless data streams that originate from tales of corporate effectiveness and maps these patterns to tell more complicated histories.

In Cheung’s Augury series, sand is used in paintings of flowers sculpted from impasto acrylic. Cheung’s inclusion of sand as a material is to him “a metaphor of existentialism… all crumbles to sand, from mortals to the grandeur of humanity”. Sand as we all know has a long and creative history, as an ingredient in the bricks that created the architecture of vast empires, the forged glass that provided the optics necessary for scientific endeavour, to the production of silicon wafers that are used in today’s computer farms. Today sand is the ingredient for a renewed source of conflict and tension as competing superpowers race to secure their share in the global shortage in silicon chips. The flowers that Cheung creates are a hybrid that is reminiscent of Dutch Golden age style still life paintings such as by Rachel Ruysch or Jan van Huysum as opposed to the more typical abstractions of Chinese ink traditions. Like in Ruysch’s paintings they can be understood as part of the vanitas tradition in which viewers are reminded that all living things, perhaps even empires in this case, will eventually wither and die.

Arrow to Heaven and Gardens of Perfect Brightness bookend two key moments of the Second Opium War. A war which by all accounts was a continuation of the imperialist temperament of the British, now joined with Western allies such as France, and to some extent Russia and the US. The Anglo-Franco contingent sought to reconsolidate their positions of power in relation to the opium and silver trade. This was, in short, a complex interaction that initially began with China’s necessity to trade with the outside world due to its need to procure increasing amounts of silver (for currency production) and lack of need for British products. Eventually, the British, as silver resources declined, saw an opportunity instead in smuggling Indian opium into China, and demanding silver as payment. As the illegal trade continued, millions of addicts were created in China and eventual hostilities ensued. The name Arrow referred to in the title of the painting (and the title of Cheung’s show) was a suspected opium smuggling boat flying under a British flag. It was seized by Chinese government soldiers, who according to the ship’s captain Thomas Kennedy had pulled down its British flag. This supposed slur to the Crown caused events to spiral for a second time and became the trigger the British needed to start a second war with China.

The painting Gardens of Perfect Brightness refers to the Old Summer Palace, located in Beijing which was an elaborate network of bridges, gardens and palaces which was looted and burned down by the Anglo-Franco retaliation to the killings of 19 of its delegation members. Its unusual hybrid Chinese and European architecture now exists only as a ruin, serving as a symbol for the destruction in the cultural relationships forged between differing nations. It was a senseless act and the ruins remain to this day. The looted treasures now belong to many museums worldwide. They are like thousands of shards, symbolising the fragments of a Qing empire shattered by war.

Shards are suggestive of violent traumas. The subject of an empire splintered by rebellions is explored in the work Two Heaven’s Collide, which depicts the roots of the downfall of the Qing Empire sown during the Taiping Rebellion (1850-1864). This was a civil war between the Manchu led Qing dynasty and the rebellious Hakka led Taiping Heavenly Kingdom which claimed the lives of between 20 and 30 million people. Cheung’s painting shows the Qing empire dissolving into a series of fractured maps which represent the rebellions that led to its downfall. Its leader Hong Xiuquan through a delirious vision, believed that he was the brother of Jesus Christ and that the Christian god had told him to purge the world of demons (in this case the ruling Manchus.) In this event, one can view the parallels of the desire to completely purge a political and social system as a struggle resonant with proto-communist values.

In Cheung’s work, we can visualise overlapping fragments of history and collective identities incised with the aesthetics of lines – trade routes, the fuzzy delineated shapes on a map, the clauses signed on a treaty or even perhaps the lines from the bible. As physical ports now morph into “nodes”, and corporates make as much money as a poorer nations annual GDP, these borders and circumscriptions become increasingly porous. It is in this dematerialising space, Cheung asks “If there is a God in the techno-sublime, where the information landscape overwhelms then what shape might God take form?”

— Sunny Cheung, Curator of M+, Museum of visual culture in Hong Kong


La première exposition solo de Gordon Cheung chez Almine Rech se donne pour repère historique la seconde guerre de l’opium, qui dura de 1856 à 1860. Elle est composée d’un ensemble de nouvelles peintures et sculptures qui explorent plus avant l’intérêt de l’artiste pour le développement de la Chine moderne et sa volonté de mettre au jour certains aspects méconnus de son invasion par l’Occident. Le Heaven du titre fait référence à la ville de Tianjin, dont le nom signifie frontière céleste ou gué, et où fût signé le Traité mettant fin à cette guerre.

L’exposition est une étude des confluences ; elle jette un regard sur l’histoire inextricable de cultures, religions et philosophies diamétralement opposées à un moment de l’histoire où l’un des côtés est en pleine accélération et fonce tête baissée dans le modernisme. Les peintures de Cheung composent un récit à couches multiples de l’activité et de l’histoire humaines ; son intérêt pour le sujet provient de son désir de comprendre ses propres racines comme Britannique d’origine chinoise. Son travail tire parti d’un large éventail d’influences, des romantiques comme Caspar David Friedrich aux sculptures influencées par les motifs des fenêtres chinoises. Et pourtant, les peintures de Cheung sont loin d’être policées : sa palette de couleurs acides (rappelant un peu le maelstrom d’allégories pyrotechniques du peintre victorien John Martin) évoque les réactions chimiques d’un monde ravagé par l’activité humaine, à la limite du chaos anthropogène ou des conséquences d’une guerre nucléaire.

L’artiste crée son esthétique particulière en s’appuyant sur des outils et techniques entièrement permis par le monde moderne. Il trouve ses visuels dans des bases d’images ou dans Google Earth, puis les imprime sur les cours de bourse des pages saumon du Financial Times. Cette technique inhabituelle forme un fond imprégné des traces de l’activité économique quotidienne tout en permettant d’autres niveaux de lecture : couche après couche, il utilise les flux infinis de données générés par les récits d’efficacité des entreprises et en cartographie les motifs pour raconter des histoires plus complexes.

Dans la série Augury, Cheung utilise le sable pour façonner ses tableaux de fleurs sculptées en empâtements acryliques. L’emploi du sable comme matériau est pour lui « une métaphore de l’existentialisme… tout redevient sable, du simple mortel à la grandeur de l’humanité ». Le sable, on le sait, a joué un rôle majeur dans l’histoire et la création : il entre dans la composition des briques qui ont servi à édifier l’architecture de vastes empires, et le verre poli a donné les instruments d’optique nécessaires à bien des avancées scientifiques. Aujourd’hui encore, il est indispensable pour produire les plaquettes de silicium qui font tourner nos ordinateurs, nouvelle source de conflits et de tensions entre superpuissances concurrentes face à la pénurie mondiale de puces électroniques. Les fleurs hybrides de Cheung rappellent les natures mortes de l’âge d’or hollandais – on pense à Rachel Ruysch ou Jan van Huysum – bien plus que les abstractions classiques du dessin à l’encre de Chine. Comme dans les tableaux de Ruysch, elles s’inscrivent plutôt dans la tradition de la vanité qui rappelle au regardeur que tous les êtres vivants – voire même les empires, dans ce cas – finissent par se faner et mourir.

Arrow to Heaven et Gardens of Perfect Brightness évoquent deux moments déterminants de la seconde guerre de l’opium, dont on s’accorde à dire qu’elle réactiva les penchants impérialistes des Britanniques, désormais rejoints par des alliés occidentaux comme la France, et dans une moindre mesure la Russie et les États-Unis. Le corps expéditionnaire franco-britannique cherche alors à asseoir son pouvoir par le commerce de l’opium et de l’argent. Des rapports complexes ont été créés par la nécessité pour la Chine de commercer avec le monde extérieur, très demandeur en argent métal (pour la production de monnaies) malgré ses faibles besoins en produits britanniques. Plus tard, face à la baisse des ressources du précieux métal, les Britanniques encouragent le trafic d’opium entre les Indes et la Chine et exigent d’être réglés en argent. Le commerce illicite se développe : la Chine compte des millions d’opiomanes, le conflit devient alors inévitable. Le nom Arrow repris dans le titre du tableau (et de l’exposition) fait référence à un cargo battant pavillon britannique et soupçonné de contrebande d’opium. Le navire est saisi par les forces chinoises qui, selon son capitaine Thomas Kennedy, ont mis à bas le drapeau britannique. Cette prétendue offense à la Couronne entraine un nouveau regain de tension et offre aux Britanniques un prétexte commode pour déclencher une deuxième guerre avec la Chine.

Le tableau Gardens of Perfect Brightness, quant à lui, fait référence à l’ancien Palais d’Été de Pékin, un ensemble raffiné de ponts, de jardins et de bâtiments pillé et incendié par les franco-britanniques en représailles du meurtre de 19 membres de leur délégation. Son architecture, mélange singulier de styles chinois et européen, n’existe plus aujourd’hui qu’à l’état de ruines et reste un symbole de la destruction insensée des relations culturelles forgées entre nations différentes. Ses trésors pillés trônent désormais dans de nombreux musées du monde entier tels des milliers d’éclats, symboles des fragments de l’empire Qing fracassé par la guerre.

Les éclats évoquent des traumatismes violents. Le sujet d’un empire éclaté par les révoltes est ainsi abordé dans l’œuvre Two Heaven’s Collide, qui dépeint les ferments de la chute de l’empire Qing contenus dans la révolte des Taiping (1850-1864), guerre civile opposant la dynastie mandchoue des Qing et les insurgés Hakkas du Royaume céleste de Taiping ; elle fit entre 20 et 30 millions de morts. Le tableau de Cheung figure l’empire Qing en train de se disloquer à travers une série de cartes fracturées représentant les rébellions qui ont conduit à sa chute. Pris de visions délirantes, Hong Xiuquan, chef des Taiping, se dit frère cadet de Jésus-Christ et déclare que le dieu des Chrétiens lui a ordonné de purger le monde des démons (dans ce cas, les Mandchous au pouvoir). On peut voir dans ces événements, motivés par la volonté de purger totalement un système politique et social, un parallèle avec les luttes animées par des valeurs proto-communistes.

Le travail de Cheung nous donne à voir des fragments superposés d’histoire et d’identités collectives traversés par l’esthétique des lignes – routes commerciales, formes floues délimitées sur une carte, clauses signées d’un traité, voire même versets bibliques. Alors que les ports physiques deviennent désormais des « hubs » et que les profits des grandes entreprises dépassent le PIB annuel de certains pays, toutes ces frontières et démarcations deviennent de plus en plus poreuses. C’est dans cet espace en cours de dématérialisation que Cheung pose la question : « S’il y a un Dieu dans le techno-sublime, univers dominé par l’information, quelle forme ce Dieu pourrait-il prendre ? »

— Sunny Cheung, Curator of M+, Museum of visual culture in Hong Kong

Installation views of Gordon Cheung, Arrow to Heaven, June 28 - July 30, 2022, Almine Rech Matignon. Photo: Ana Drittanti


more to explore:

 
 

By using GalleriesNow.net you agree to our use of cookies to enhance your experience. Close