Eugène Leroy: Mythe

, ,
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm

18 avenue Matignon, 75008, Paris, France
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm


Visit    

Eugène Leroy: Mythe

Paris

Eugène Leroy: Mythe
to Sat 28 May 2022
Tue-Sat 11am-7pm

Artworks

L'enfant, 1980-1986

Oil on canvas
97 x 145 cm 38 1/2 x 57 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Têtes, 1987

Oil on canvas
92 x 65 cm 36 1/2 x 25 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Nu, 1985-1990

Oil on canvas
92 x 73 cm 36 1/2 x 28 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Peinture, 1990

Oil on canvas
61 x 46 cm 24 1/2 x 18 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

La grande bleue, 1989

Oil on canvas
130 x 97 cm 51 1/2 x 38 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Paysage, 1980-1990

Oil on canvas
61 x 50 cm 24 1/2 x 19 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Ohne Titel (Nu), 1997

Oil on canvas
92 x 73 cm 36 1/2 x 28 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Couple (DK), 1998-1999

Oil on canvas
130 x 97 cm 51 1/2 x 38 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Nu, 1990-1999

Oil on canvas
130 x 97 cm 51 1/2 x 38 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Tête, 1998-1999

Oil on canvas
61 x 50 cm 24 1/2 x 19 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Tête, 1998-1999

Oil on canvas
61 x 50 cm 24 1/2 x 19 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Tête, 1995-1999

Oil on canvas
61 x 46 cm 24 1/2 x 18 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Nu, 1995-2000

Oil on canvas
92 x 65 cm 36 1/2 x 25 1/2 in
© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti

contact gallery

Added to list

Done

Removed

Almine Rech Matignon Eugene Leroy 1

Almine Rech Matignon Eugene Leroy 2

Almine Rech Matignon Eugene Leroy 3

Almine Rech Matignon Eugene Leroy 4

Almine Rech Matignon Eugene Leroy 5

Almine Rech Matignon Eugene Leroy 6

Almine Rech Matignon Eugene Leroy 7

Almine Rech Matignon Eugene Leroy 8

Almine Rech Matignon Eugene Leroy 9

click for Press Release in French

Born in 1910, Eugène Leroy spent long hours as a student at the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Lille, spending much of his time in front of paintings by Rubens. He soon began to reject the academic conventions that had been instilled in him. Weary of his studies, he continued his education by going to Flemish museums, where he was especially moved by Rembrandt’s work. His wanderings expanded to all of Europe and beyond its borders. He was determined to learn from painters who “see what he would like to be able to see.”[1] The art of these impasto painters gave Leroy permission to engage even more deeply with his interest in thick paint strokes. However, the artist never fell into pure imitation. On the contrary, he used this otherness to develop and affirm his own artistic vision. His early works depicted classical subjects, portraits, landscapes, floral compositions, and religious scenes. Yet they made a strong impression because they already stood out through their energetic brushstrokes and their sense of movement, which went against the tide of the artistic conventions of the period. “Leroy has become a colorist,” his first professor, Fernand Beaucamp, said. This can be seen in La grande bleue (1989), which is representative of his great mastery of the power of color. Beaucamp also pointed out the “instinctive,” “rough,” and “mystical” aspect of his former student’s paintings, which can especially be observed in L’Automne (1995).

“Saying that Leroy doesn’t seek to make paintings at any cost, but to capture true light in painted color (truly painted, molded by human hands on the canvas), is perhaps a way to justify his work while risking the least confusion.”[2]

This exhibition highlights the artist’s passion for paint and relief, which he sometimes obtained by working directly with his hands, without using a brush. The thickness thus produced is a trop,[3] or “too much,” a gargantuan accumulation of paint, a superimposition of layers, an astonishing build-up, an excess that is actually measured and developed in every detail.

Depositing paint directly out of the tube allowed Leroy to obtain a raw effect, which looked as if it had not been shaped but was produced by elemental intuition without any mental development. It seems that the painting has composed itself spontaneously, instinctively, independently of artistic conventions and of the artist himself. “Everything I’ve ever tried in painting is to reach […] a kind of absence, almost, so that the painting would be completely itself.”[4]

Leroy’s approach depended on total experience and the act of creation, disconnected from conventions and theories determining modern painting and the attempted reforms to which it was then subjected. This could be seen in his studio, which was entirely covered by a painting that extended beyond the canvases, creating an artistic immersion, an invasion of the space of the real world that would not be confined to the medium.

Eugène Leroy’s art was not simply about crossing the boundaries that separate content and subjects, the canvas and the studio, or art and life, but abolishing them. He refused to assign them to a strict role and tried, on the contrary, to promote their dialogue and their permeability. “More than ever I merge my life and my painting […].”[5]

What Eugène Leroy offers us is a painting of the discernible, of the living and the moving, of perceptible matter, of the sea, landscapes, and bodies and their flesh, stirring the emotions and the senses.

The artist makes the choice of voluntarily destabilizing us. As viewers, we are used to always trying to identify what our eyes see, defining and naming what we observe. What his paintings show is the inexpressible, the result of a “disidentification of the theme”[6] that he deliberately undertakes in his paintings. So we are mystified, deprived of our ability to explain what we see because the subject is so unrecognizable, and thus, for once, we are made silent.

It is a break between what is seen and what is known,[7] making any understanding difficult. It is the result of the superimposition of countless layers of paint that come, like strata, to absorb the subject without erasing it. For Eugène Leroy, the absence of the subject that makes itself felt at first sight actually makes the subject even more present.

[1] Eugène Leroy in “À voix nue,” a radio interview with Jean Daive, France Culture, April 20-24, 1998.
[2] Marcel Evrard, in Eugène Leroy, Jacques Bornibus. Une complicité, la peinture, années 50, exhibition catalogue, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Tourcoing, June 19 – September 12, 2004.
[3] “L’atelier dans la peinture,” Pierre Wat.
[4] Eugène Leroy, “De la matière et de sa clarté. Entretien avec Irmeline Lebeer,” in Eugène
Leroy. Peinture, Lentille du Monde
, Brussels, Lebeer Hossmann, 1979, p.69.
[5] Eugène Leroy, “Lettre-préface à Louis Deledicq,” in Chemins de la Création, exhibition
catalogue, Château d’Ancy-le-Franc, June 2 – September 10, 1973
[6] See note 5.
[7] See note 5.


Né en 1910, Eugène Leroy passe de longues heures au cours de ses études au Palais des Beaux-Arts de Lille, où il côtoie notamment les toiles de Rubens. Rapidement il manifeste un certain rejet des conventions académiques qui lui sont inculquées. Lassé des études, il poursuit sa formation en se rendant dans les musées flamands, où l’œuvre de Rembrandt le touche particulièrement. Ses pérégrinations s’étendent à l’Europe entière, puis au-delà des frontières du vieux continent, portées par la volonté d’apprendre des peintres qui « voient ce qu’il aimerait savoir voir »[1]. L’art de ces peintres de l’empâtement valent comme une autorisation pour Eugène Leroy à s’engager plus encore dans son penchant pour le travail de l’épaisseur de la matière. Pour autant, jamais l’artiste ne verse dans l’imitation pure mais, au contraire, se nourrit de cette altérité pour affirmer sa propre singularité artistique.

Ses premières œuvres donnent à voir des sujets classiques, portraits, paysages, compositions florales et scènes religieuses, et marquent néanmoins les esprits en ce qu’elles se distinguent, déjà, par la fougue de ses coups de pinceaux et le mouvement se dégageant de ses toiles, à contre-courant des conventions artistique de l’époque.
“Leroy s’est fait coloriste” déclare son premier professeur Fernand Beaucamp, comme en atteste La grande bleue, 1989, représentative de sa haute maîtrise de la puissance chromatique. Il pointe également la dimension « instinctive », « rugueuse » et « mystique » des tableaux de son ancien élève, que l’on observe notamment avec L’Automne, 1995.

« Dire que Leroy ne cherche pas à tout prix à faire des tableaux, mais à fixer de la lumière vraie dans la couleur peinte (vraiment peinte, pétrie de main d’homme sur la toile), c’est peut-être justifier son œuvre en risquant le moins de confusion. [2]»

L’exposition met en valeur la passion de l’artiste pour la matière et son relief, obtenu en travaillant parfois même directement à la main, se passant de l’intermédiaire du pinceau. Cette épaisseur obtenue est un trop [3], une accumulation gargantuesque de pâte, une superposition de couches, un amoncellement vertigineux ; un excès en réalité en tout point mesuré et recherché.

Le dépôt de peinture directement sortie de son tube permet l’obtention d’un rendu brut, à l’apparence non façonnée, comme le fruit d’une intuition primaire éloignée de toute élaboration mentale, comme si la peinture se composait elle-même, spontanément, instinctivement, indépendamment des conventions artistiques et de l’artiste lui-même.
« Tout ce que j’ai jamais essayé en peinture, c’est d’arriver […] à une espèce d’absence presque, pour que la peinture soit totalement elle-même »[4].

La démarche se veut relever de l’expérience totale, de l’acte de création, loin des conventions et théories régissant la peinture moderne et des tentatives de réformes auxquelles elle est alors sujette. En témoigne son atelier, entièrement recouvert d’une peinture qui déborde les toiles, créant une immersion picturale, un envahissement de l’espace du monde réel et non pas cantonnée au support.

Pour Eugène Leroy, il ne s’agit pas simplement de franchir les frontières qui séparent le fond et les sujets, la toile et l’atelier, ou l’art de la vie, mais bien de les abolir. Il se refuse à les assigner à une place stricte et cherche, à l’inverse, à favoriser leur dialogue et la perméabilité de l’un à l’autre. « Plus que jamais je confonds ma vie et ma peinture […] »[5].

Ce qu’Eugène Leroy nous offre est une peinture du sensible, du vivant et du mouvant, de la matière perceptible, de la mer, des paysages, des corps et de leur chair, attisant les émotions et les sens.

L’artiste prend le parti de nous déstabiliser volontairement, nous, spectateurs dont le regard est accoutumé à toujours chercher à identifier, définir et nommer ce qu’il observe. Or ce que ses toiles donnent à voir relève de l’indicible, résultante d’une « désidentification du motif »[6] qu’il entreprend délibérément dans ses toiles. Nous voici donc déroutés, privés de notre capacité à expliciter ce que nous voyons tant le sujet peint est méconnaissable, et ainsi rendus, pour une fois, muets.

C’est une rupture entre le voir et le savoir [7], qui rend toute compréhension malaisée. C’est le résultat d’une superposition d’innombrables couches de peintures qui viennent, telles des strates, absorber le sujet sans pour autant l’effacer. Pour Eugène Leroy en effet, l’absence du sujet qui s’impose à première vue permet en réalité de le rendre d’autant plus présent.

[1] Eugène Leroy dans “À voix nue”, entretien radiophonique avec Jean Daive, France Culture, 20-24 avril 1998
[2] Marcel Evrard, dans Eugène Leroy, Jacques Bornibus. Une complicité, la peinture, années 50, cat. exp., musée des Beaux-Arts de Tourcoing, 19 juin – 12 septembre 2004
[3] Texte “L’atelier dans la peinture”, Pierre Wat
[4] Eugène Leroy, « De la matière et de sa clarté. Entretien avec Irmeline Lebeer », dans Eugène Leroy. Peinture, lentille du monde, Bruxelles, Lebeer Hossmann, 1979, p.69
[5] Eugène Leroy, « Lettre-préface à Louis Deledicq », dans Chemins de la création, cat. exp., château d’Ancy-le-Franc, 2 juin-10 septembre 1973
[6] Voir note 5
[7] Voir note 5

© Estate of the Artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Ana Drittanti


more to explore:

 
 

By using GalleriesNow.net you agree to our use of cookies to enhance your experience. Close