Bridget Riley: Lines of Enquiry
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Bridget Riley: Lines of Enquiry @ Lyndsey Ingram, London

Tue 17 Sep 2019 to Fri 8 Nov 2019

Bridget Riley: Lines of Enquiry @ Lyndsey Ingram

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Open: Mon-Fri 10am-6pm

20 Bourdon Street, W1K 3PL, London West End, UK
Open: Mon-Fri 10am-6pm


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Bridget Riley: Lines of Enquiry

London

Bridget Riley: Lines of Enquiry
to Fri 8 Nov 2019
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm

At the heart of this exhibition is a complete survey of Bridget Riley’s early prints (1962-1968). The presentation includes all of her early black and white screenprints, starting with Primitive Blaze (1962) through to Winged Curve (1966).

Lyndsey Ingram Bridget Riley 1

Lyndsey Ingram Bridget Riley 2

Lyndsey Ingram Bridget Riley 3

Lyndsey Ingram Bridget Riley 4

Lyndsey Ingram Bridget Riley 5

Lyndsey Ingram Bridget Riley 8

These monochrome, concise, geometric works mark the start of the artist’s exploration into visual sensation that continues throughout her career. After the mid-1960s, Riley gradually moved towards colour and the final work in the exhibition is the complete portfolio of Nineteen Greys (1968), which marks this crucial transition.

This was also a particularly dynamic period in Riley’s career and at a time when her work was first being introduced to a global audience. In 1965, Riley was included in the Museum of Modern Art’s seminal Op-Art exhibition The Responsive Eye and in 1968 she represented Britain at the 34th Venice Biennial. The drawing Study for Deny I, which is included in our show, was shown in her Venice pavilion.

‘Lines of Enquiry’ follows on from our Hockney etching show in February 2017 and we have taken a similar approach, showing a complete survey of the artist’s early graphic work. The exhibition at Lyndsey Ingram will coincide with a major Riley retrospective at the Hayward gallery opening in October.

The gallery is very firmly grounded in art from the post-war period to the present, however, for this exhibition, we have collaborated with Aaron Gallery, Jamb and James Graham-Stewart to bring together some of the finest examples of Classical marble sculpture and fine Regency design. The chimneypiece designed by the architect Sir John Soane is similar to one he devised for the interior of Downing Street. The four exquisite marble heads and torso date from 4thcentury B.C. to 2ndcentury A.D.

Spanning a vast expanse of time, style, and technique, these prints and objects share a fundamental formal rigour. The gallery itself has been completely transformed, including panelling. The aim is to create an unexpected experience for viewers that sparks conversations and connections.

Courtesy of Lyndsey Ingram, London

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