Brian Calvin: More

, ,
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm

Abdijstraat 20 Rue de l’Abbaye, 1050, Brussels, Belgium
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm


Visit    

Brian Calvin: More

Brussels

Brian Calvin: More
to Sat 28 May 2022
Tue-Sat 11am-7pm
Artist: Brian Calvin

click for Press Release in French

Almine Rech Brussels presents ‘More’, Brian Calvin’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery.

Artworks

The front, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
177.8 x 142.2 cm 70 x 56 in

contact gallery

The arrangement, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
213.4 x 142.2 cm 84 x 56 in

contact gallery

Draper, 2022

Acrylic on linen
50.8 x 40.6 cm 20 x 16 in

contact gallery

Backstage, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
142.2 x 213.4 cm 56 x 84 in

contact gallery

Gateway, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
142.2 x 177.8 cm 56 x 70 in

contact gallery

Sinking, 2022

Acrylic on linen
91.4 x 61 cm 36 x 24 in

contact gallery

Sisters at night, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
213.4 x 142.2 cm 84 x 56 in

contact gallery

Facing forward, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
152.4 x 121.9 cm 60 x 48 in

contact gallery

Sister, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
152.4 x 121.9 cm 60 x 48 in

contact gallery

Observing, 2022

Acrylic on linen
35.6 x 27.9 cm 14 x 11 in

contact gallery

Resemblance, 2022

Acrylic on linen
61 x 45.7 cm 24 x 18 in

contact gallery

Sway, 2022

Acrylic on linen
61 x 45.7 cm 24 x 18 in

contact gallery

Moonlight mile, 2022

Acrylic on linen
61 x 45.7 cm 24 x 18 in

contact gallery

Sisters, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
101.6 x 81.3 cm 40 x 32 in

contact gallery

Tilt, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
101.6 x 81.3 cm 40 x 32 in

contact gallery

Full force, 2022

Acrylic on canvas
101.6 x 81.3 cm 40 x 32 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2021

Pastel and graphite on paper
17.8 x 12.7 cm 7 x 5 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Acrylic and ink on paper
21.6 x 15.2 cm 8 1/2 x 6 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Pastel on paper
16.5 x 26 cm 6 1/2 x 10 1/2 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Pastel and paint marker on paper
29.7 x 21.1 cm 11 1/2 x 8 1/2 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2021

Pastel on paper
29.7 x 21.1 cm 11 1/2 x 8 1/2 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2021

Oil pastel on paper
29.7 x 21.1 cm 11 1/2 x 8 1/2 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2021

Oil pastel on paper
29.7 x 41.9 cm 11 1/2 x 16 1/2 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2021

Pastel and color pencil on paper
29.7 x 41.9 cm 11 1/2 x 16 1/2 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2021

Pastel on paper
76.2 x 55.9 cm 30 x 22 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2021

Pastel on paper
76.2 x 55.9 cm 30 x 22 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2021

Pastel on paper
76.2 x 55.9 cm 30 x 22 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Pastel on paper
76.2 x 55.9 cm 30 x 22 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Pastel on paper
76.2 x 55.9 cm 30 x 22 in

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Pastel on paper
76.2 x 55.9 cm 30 x 22 in

contact gallery

Added to list

Done

Removed

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 1

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 2

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 3

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 4

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 5

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 6

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 7

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 8

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 9

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 10

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 11

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 12

Almine Rech Brussels Brian Calvin 13

Brian Calvin is an artist whose methods are both modest and expansive. For three decades he has pursued the representation of the human figure – mainly faces, mainly women. Within these self-imposed parameters (which, of course, he periodically abandons) Calvin has created a body of work that is at once elusive and familiar, winsome and affecting, historically referential and stridently contemporary.

Calvin’s exhibition More follows his last with Almine Rech, which was titled More Days – itself a play on the title of an exhibition early in Calvin’s career simply called Days. Every picture by this artist builds on its precedents, both within his oeuvre and within the canon of Western and global art. He is an artist who, in his own words, sees painting as “a long game.”

Calvin says he “walked backwards” into Picasso, whose synthetic Cubist portraits have become an explicit influence on his work since 2020. Cubism, for Calvin, is a means of packing more information into a given pictorial container. More time, more space, more colour, more texture, more pattern and decoration: after Calvin first empties out the shapes of these faces, reducing them to elemental forms, he fills them back up to the brim, almost to spilling point.

In previous paintings, Calvin experimented with multi-figure compositions in which faces were stacked and aligned in order to create complex intersecting arrangements in shallow pictorial space. In this new exhibition of acrylic paintings and pastel drawings, individual faces predominate, but Cubism enables Calvin to represent multiple viewpoints within single tightly-cropped heads.

The paintings are full in other ways too. Look at the figures’ eyes in paintings such as Tilt and Draper. The irises crystallize into psychedelically intricate subsections, and the shadows and makeup around the eyes explode into dazzling fields of pattern. Colour, which Calvin has long deployed to captivating effect, here is pushed towards maximum saturation.

Despite the outrageous excesses of palette and decoration, Calvin’s paintings are anchored in a realist tradition. These faces belong in our world; they are people we can imagine meeting and interacting with or, at the very least, seeing on our screens. They are fully realized, and fully grounded, even if – on reflection – heavy blue and green eyeshadow is rarely seen these days.

This balance between specificity and abstraction, naturalism and idealism, is at the root of Calvin’s paintings’ appeal. He has a remarkable ability to capture certain characteristics
– shyness, perhaps, or anxiety, or hesitancy – that set his pictures apart from most images of women in mainstream media. (When did a photograph of a fashion model, for example, have half as much inner life as one of Calvin’s muses?) Nevertheless, these women are ultimately nothing so much as figments of his imagination, actors in a world that is his own aesthetic construction.

When is a picture of a face not a portrait? Calvin’s paintings test the tolerance of this category. Unlike in his previous exhibition, More Days, none of the works in this exhibition are titled after subjects’ names. While they all embody distinct identities, it is questionable whether those identities relate to the people on which they might have been based, or whether those people would anyway recognize themselves in their representations. It is, of course, impossible to know whether any of our faces represent our true inner selves. Calvin’s painting Backstage, in which blond hair is pinned back like theatre curtains, acknowledges the face as a façade, a platform on which drama might unfold but which is ultimately an opaque screen.

As pictures of young women made by a man who is also a husband and father of girls, it is impossible to think about Calvin’s work without considering beauty. In many pictures, these women are self-beautifying – sporting flowers in their hair, for instance, or wearing makeup – but they are generally not beautiful according to the anodyne standards of the fashion and entertainment industries. Calvin might not flatter his subjects, but he does approach them with empathy, admiration and respect. His work has long been recognized for its easy, quick charm – and indeed its beauty – but over time it emerges as something more nuanced, more ambivalent and less carefree, something that takes root and blossoms in the empty space between his subjects’ outward appearances and their inner lives.

– Jonathan Griffin, writer and art critic.


Brian Calvin est un artiste dont les méthodes sont à la fois modestes et expansives. Depuis trois décennies, il se consacre à la représentation de la figure humaine – surtout des visages, surtout en particulier des femmes. Dans le cadre de ces limites qu’il s’impose (et auxquelles il renonce parfois, évidemment), Calvin a su créer un ensemble d’œuvres à la fois insaisissables et familières, séduisantes et touchantes, pleines de références historiques et résolument contemporaines.

More fait suite à sa précédente exposition chez Almine Rech, More Days – déjà un clin d’œil au titre d’une de ses toutes premières, simplement intitulée Days. Toutes les images de l’artiste développent celles qui les ont précédées, à la fois dans son œuvre et plus largement dans les canons de l’art occidental et mondial. C’est un artiste qui, selon ses propres termes, considère la peinture comme un processus « de longue haleine ».

Calvin explique que c’est ‘à rebours’ qu’il a découvert Picasso, dont les portraits cubistes synthétiques influencent explicitement son travail depuis 2020. À ses yeux, le cubisme est un moyen de faire figurer plus d’informations dans un contenant cadre pictural donné. Plus de temps, plus d’espace, plus de couleur, plus de texture, plus de motifs et d’ornementation : Calvin commence par évider les visages, les réduisant à des formes élémentaires, puis les remplit à ras bord, à la limite du débordement.

Dans de précédents travaux, Calvin s’est essayé à des compositions de figures multiples, faites de visages empilés, alignés, formant des ensembles complexes enchevêtrés dans un espace pictural peu profond. Dans cette nouvelle exposition de peintures à l’acrylique et de dessins au pastel, les visages seuls dominent, même si le cubisme permet à Calvin de représenter des points de vue multiples au sein d’une unique tête cadrée serréétroitement.

Les tableaux sont remplis à bien d’autres titres. Prenez par exemple les yeux des personnages de Tilt ou Draper : les iris se cristallisent en différentes parties d’une complexité psychédélique ; les ombres et le maquillage qui cerclent les yeux explosent en motifs éblouissants. La couleur, que Calvin déploie depuis toujours pour son effet envoûtant, tend ici vers la saturation maximale.

Malgré les excès extravagants de la palette et de l’ornement, les tableaux de Calvin restent ancrés dans une tradition réaliste. Ces visages appartiennent à notre monde ; ce sont des personnages que l’on peut s’imaginer rencontrer, dialoguer avec ou, à tout le moins, découvrir sur nos écrans. Ils sont pleinement réalisés et parfaitement concrets, même si, à la réflexion, on voit rarement des fards à paupières bleus et verts aussi chargés à notre époque.

Cet équilibre entre spécificité et abstraction, naturalisme et idéalisme, est ce qui fait tout l’attrait de sa peinture. Calvin a cette faculté remarquable de capter certaines caractéristiques – la timidité, parfois, l’anxiété, ou l’hésitation – qui distinguent ses images de la plupart des représentations de la femme dans les médias classiques (quelle photo de top-modèle, par exemple, peut se targuer d’exprimer ne serait-ce que la moitié de la vie intérieure qu’on trouve chez les muses de Calvin ?) Et pourtant, ces femmes ne sont finalement rien d’autre que les produits de son imagination, personnages peuplant un monde qui est sa construction esthétique propre.

Quand la représentation d’un visage n’est-elle pas un portrait ? Les tableaux de Calvin testent les limites du genre. Contrairement à son exposition précédente, More Days, aucune des œuvres ici ne porte le nom de son sujet. Même si chacune incarne une identité distincte, il est permis de se demander si toutes ces identités correspondent vraiment aux personnes qui pourraient les avoir inspirées, ou même si elles seraient capables de se reconnaître dans ces représentations. Il est bien sûr impossible de savoir si le moindre visage que nous montrons reflète notre vrai moi intérieur. Le tableau Backstage de Calvin, où les cheveux blonds sont tirés en arrière comme des rideaux de théâtre, présente le visage comme façade, plateau sur lequel un drame peut se dérouler, mais reste irrémédiablement un écran opaque.

L’auteur de ces portraits de jeunes femmes est aussi époux et père de deux filles ; on ne peut donc envisager son œuvre sans prendre en compte la beauté. Dans nombre d’images, ce sont les femmes elles-mêmes qui se font belles – en piquant des fleurs dans leurs cheveux, par exemple, ou en se maquillant – bien qu’elles ne correspondent souvent pas aux normes de la beauté aseptisée en vigueur dans la mode ou le show-business. Calvin ne flatte peut-être pas ses sujets, mais il les envisage avec empathie, admiration et respect. Son travail est depuis longtemps admiré pour son charme facile et rapide, parfois même sa beauté ; mais au fil du temps, on y découvre quelque chose de plus nuancé, de plus ambivalent, de moins insouciant. Quelque chose qui prend racine et s’épanouit dans l’interstice qui existe entre les apparences extérieures de ses sujets et leur vie intérieure.

– Jonathan Griffin, écrivain et critique d’art.

Photo: Huggard & Vanoverschelde Photography.


more to explore:

 
 

By using GalleriesNow.net you agree to our use of cookies to enhance your experience. Close