Allora & Calzadilla: Antille

, ,
Open: Tue-Fri 10am-6pm, Sat 11am-7pm

10 rue Charlot, 75003, Paris, France
Open: Tue-Fri 10am-6pm, Sat 11am-7pm


Visit    

Allora & Calzadilla: Antille

Paris

Allora & Calzadilla: Antille
to Sat 28 May 2022
Tue-Fri 10am-6pm, Sat 11am-7pm

click for Press Release in French

Galerie Chantal Crousel presents Antille (1) by Allora & Calzadilla. The exhibition brings together three major works that center on the Caribbean where the artists live and work. Grounded in the concrete realities of this complex archipelago, the works in Antille consider how colonialism and ecology intersect with Empire building.

Artworks

Graft, 2021

Recycled polyvinyl chloride
Variable dimensions
Edition of 3. Courtesy of the artists and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. Photo: Martin Argyroglo

contact gallery

Electromagnetic Field: February 16, 2022 (Meter Number 96215234, Consumption Charge 425kWh x $0.04944, Consumption Charge for Additional 1,205kWh x $0.05564, Fuel Charge Adj 1,630kWh x $0.147356, Purchased Power Charge Adj 1,630kWh x $0.036202, Municipalities Adj 1,630kWh x $0.003235, Subsidies, Public Light other Subv HH, 1,630kWh x $0.0010368, Subsidies, Public Light other Subv NHH 1,630kWh x $0.000522, 2022

Iron filings on linen
213 x 160 cm | 84 x 63 inches
Courtesy of the artists and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. Photo: Martin Argyroglo

contact gallery

Electromagnetic Field: January 5, 2022 (Meter Number 96215234, Consumption Charge 425kWh x $0.04944, Consumption Charge for Additional 1,485kWh x $0.05564, Fuel Charge Adj 1,910kWh x $0.147356, Purchased Power Charge Adj 1,910kWh x $0.036202, Municipalities Adj 1,910kWh x $0.003235, Subsidies, Public Light & other Subv HH, 1,910kWh x $0.0010368, Subsidies, Public Light & other Subv NHH 1,910kWh x $0.000522), 2022

Iron filings on linen
213 x 160 cm | 84 x 63 inches
Courtesy of the artists and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. Photo: Martin Argyroglo

contact gallery

Penumbra, 2020 - 2022

Digital projection with sound
Variable dimensions
Courtesy of the artists and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. Photo: Martin Argyroglo

contact gallery

Added to list

Done

Removed

Allora & Calzadilla - Antille - Galerie Chantal Crousel

Allora & Calzadilla - Antille - Galerie Chantal Crousel

Allora & Calzadilla - Antille - Galerie Chantal Crousel

Throughout the gallery the artists have installed Penumbra (2020) a virtual landscape that takes the shape shifting qualities of light and shadow as its substance. The projected digital animation recreates the effect of light passing through foliage in the Absalon Valley of Martinique. This tropical forest was the site of a series of now-mythic hikes that took place in 1941 with Suzanne and Aimé Césaire (the Martinican anticolonial poets, theoreticians, and founders of the literary journal Tropiques) and a group of artists and intellectuals fleeing Nazi-occupied France, whose boat had temporarily docked at the West Indian port of Fort-de-France. The refugees included Helena Benitez, André Breton, Wifredo Lam, Jacqueline Lamba, Claude Lévi-Strauss, André Masson, and Victor Serge, among others (2). Penumbra is projected in the gallery at an angle based on a real-time simulation of the sun’s location overhead. The artificial light flickers across the space and intermingles with dancing patterns of the sun passing through clouds moving over Paris. Through this interaction, two disparate places converge and create a paradox of light. Penumbra is complemented by a musical composition by the Grammy-award- winning and Oscar-nominated composer David Lang and inspired by “shadow tones,” a psycho-acoustic phenomenon perceived when two real tones create the semblance of a third.

Also installed throughout the space is Graft (2021). Thousands of pink blossoms, cast from the flowers of roble trees (Tabebuia heterophylla), an oak species native to the Caribbean, appear as though a wind has swept them across the floor. The hand- painted petals are reproduced in seven variations or degrees of decomposition, from the freshly fallen to the wilted and brown. Graft alludes to environmental changes that have been set in motion through the interlocking effects of colonial exploitation and climate change. Systemic depletion of Caribbean flora and fauna is one of the primary legacies of colonial rule. Nonetheless, the region remains one of thirty-six biodiversity hotspots, areas that support nearly 60% of the world’s plant, bird, mammal, reptile, and amphibian species but that amount to just 2.4% of the earth’s land surface. In their plastic and unnatural stillness, the flowers in Graft reflect this fragile ecological predicament.

Finally on view are three recent works from the artists Electromagnetic Field series, initiated in 2018, which takes electromagnetism, one of the four fundamental forces of nature, as its subject and medium. The artists experiment with electromagnetism to create forms that are at once abstract and referential. They drop iron filings on top of a canvas and place it above an array of copper cables connected to an electrical breaker in their studio in San Juan. When the breaker is turned on, the electrical current forces the particles into an arrangement of shapes and patterns governed by the electromagnetic field. To set them in motion, the taut canvas is continuously tapped which sends the heavy bits airborne and towards the positive and negative poles.

Attraction and repulsion, strength and weakness, accumulation and dispersal are some of the tools the artists employ to find formal resolution in the electromagnetic works. However, the rhythmic balance achieved does not mute the pulsing forces that condition the very appearance of the artwork – from stock market cycles to fossil fuel combustions. The parenthetical component of the work’s title, a lengthy sequence of numbers and letters that they took from their studio electric bill refers to the politics related to the generation, ownership, and distribution of electricity. It is part of the artists’ ongoing interest in using electricity in their art to probe the many facets and figures involved in energy consumption in Puerto Rico and beyond, from the oil futures market and transnational holders of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority’s bond debt to the local consumers who suffer the consequences of the bankrupt power authority’s fiscal mismanagement. Allora & Calzadilla’s artistic experiments with electromagnetism are in equal part an exploration of formal principals and a way of confronting the complex nexus that is the energy grid.

Michelle White, head curator of the Menil Collection in Houston, where the artists presented their critically acclaimed solo exhibition Specters of Noon in 2020 / 21 remarked in the accompanying publication, about Allora & Calzadilla’s particular artistic approach: “From the beginning of their partnership in 1995, the artistic duo have explored how socioeconomic inequalities in our contemporary moment collide with the natural world, with all of its marvels and increasingly frightening and overwhelming phenomena. They delight in this discordant and illuminating interaction, which delves into unlikely connections and ignites revealing conversations. Pulling substances, materials, and sounds out of particular contexts, histories, or sites, these works move the viewer through wildly divergent temporal, material, political, and theoretical terrains.” (3)

(1) The word Antille originated in the period before the European colonization of the Americas, Antilia being one of those mysterious lands which figured on the medieval charts, sometimes as an archipelago, sometimes as continuous land of greater or lesser extent, its location fluctuating in mid-ocean.
(2) Breton described the Absalon forest in terms that also pertain to the light’s movement found in Penumbra: “the tangle of these trees that specialize in acrobatics, boost each other into the clouds, leap over cliffs and cut moaning arches over sweet sorceresses under suction cups of sticky flowers.” The gouffre d’Absalon valley in Martinique served in part as inspiration for Lam’s masterpiece, The Jungle. It was his first time visiting a tropical forest, even though he was born and raised in Cuba. Claude Levi-Strauss would go on to write about the transatlantic crossing and his time in Martinique in Tristes Tropiques. André Masson produced a series of drawings based on the Martinican landscape, some of which were published in Breton’s Martinique Charmeuse de Serpents.
(3) White Michelle et al., Allora & Calzadilla : Specters of Noon, The Menil Collection, September 26, 2020-June 20, 2021 [Exhibition Catalogue]. Houston, USA: The Menil Collection


La Galerie Chantal Crousel a le plaisir de présenter Antille (1), par Allora & Calzadilla. L’exposition réunit trois de leurs œuvres majeures inspirées des Caraïbes, où les artistes vivent et travaillent. Ancrées dans les réalités concrètes de cet archipel complexe, les œuvres de l’ensemble Antille examinent la façon dont colonialisme et écologie se croisent à l’intersection des visées impérialistes.

L’installation Penumbra (2020) qui traverse tout l’espace de la galerie, est un paysage virtuel dont la matière même est constituée par des variations de lumière et d’ombre. Une animation numérique projetée recrée les effets de la lumière traversant les feuillages dans la vallée d’Absalon, en Martinique. Cette forêt tropicale accueillit en 1941 une série de randonnées pédestres désormais mythiques, conduites par Suzanne et Aimé Césaire (poètes martiniquais, militants anticolonialistes, théoriciens et fondateurs de la revue littéraire Tropiques), avec un groupe d’artistes et d’intellectuels qui fuyaient alors la France occupée, et dont le bateau avait fait escale dans le port antillais de Fort-de-France. Parmi ces réfugiés figuraient notamment Helena Benitez, André Breton, Wifredo Lam, Jacqueline Lamba, Claude Lévi-Strauss, André Masson et Victor Serge (2). Penumbra est projeté dans la galerie suivant un angle calculé par un système de simulation en temps réel qui reproduit la course du soleil au-dessus de nos têtes. Ce jour artificiel fluctue dans l’espace de la galerie et se mêle aux motifs dansants de la lumière du soleil qui traverse réellement les nuages courant au-dessus des toits de Paris. Dans cette interaction, deux lieux disparates convergent pour créer ensemble un paradoxe lumineux. Penumbra est complétée par une composition musicale de David Lang, lauréat d’un Grammy Award et sélectionné aux Oscars, qui s’inspire des « shadow tones », un phénomène psycho-acoustique perçu lorsque deux tons réels créent à l’oreille la sensation d’un troisième ton.

L’installation Graft (3) (2021) traverse également tout l’espace de la galerie. Des milliers de fleurs roses, moulées à partir de fleurs de poirier des Antilles, ou « Poirier-Pays », une espèce de chêne originaire des Caraïbes (Tabebuia heterophylla), apparaissent comme poussées là par un vent qui les auraient balayées à la surface du sol. Leurs pétales peints à la main reproduisent sept variations ou degrés de décomposition, du fraîchement tombé au bruni, en passant par le flétri. Graft est une allusion aux mutations environnementales déclenchées par les effets combinés de l’exploitation coloniale et des changements climatiques. L’appauvrissement systémique de la flore et de la faune des Caraïbes est l’un des principaux héritages de la domination coloniale. Néanmoins, la région demeure l’un des trente-six points névralgiques de la biodiversité mondiale, comportant des zones qui, tout en abritant près de 60% des espèces de plantes, d’oiseaux, de mammifères, de reptiles et d’amphibiens encore présents dans le monde, ne représentent que 2,4% de la surface terrestre planétaire. Dans leur immobilité plastique et artificielle, les fleurs de l’installation Graft reflètent la fragilité de cette situation écologique.

Enfin, sont exposées trois œuvres récentes du duo d’artistes de la série des Electromagnetic Field, commencée en 2018, qui prend l’électromagnétisme, l’une des quatre forces fondamentales de la nature, à la fois comme sujet et médium. Allora & Calzadilla se servent de ce phénomène pour créer des formes à la fois abstraites et référentielles. Ils déposent de la limaille de fer sur une toile, qu’ils placent au- dessus d’un réseau de câbles de cuivre reliés à un disjoncteur électrique dans leur studio de San Juan. Lorsque le disjoncteur est mis en marche, le courant électrique force les particules métalliques à se disposer suivant un arrangement de formes et de motifs régis par le champ électromagnétique. Afin que ces particules se mettent en mouvement, la toile est maintenue tendue et tapotée en continu, ce qui a pour effet de propulser les particules lourdes dans l’air, en direction des pôles positifs et négatifs.

Attraction et répulsion, résistance et faiblesse, accumulation et dispersion sont quelques-uns des dispositifs dont les artistes usent pour parvenir à une résolution formelle dans ces œuvres électromagnétiques. Cependant, l’équilibre rythmique ainsi atteint ne relègue pas au second plan les forces pulsatrices qui modèlent l’apparence même de l’œuvre d’art — depuis les cycles boursiers jusqu’à la combustion des énergies fossiles. La composante parenthétique du titre de l’œuvre (une longue séquence de chiffres et de lettres tirée d’une des factures d’électricité de leur atelier de création) fait référence aux politiques publiques menées en matière de production, de propriété et de distribution d’électricité. Cet intérêt que les deux artistes portent depuis toujours à l’utilisation de l’électricité leur permet notamment de sonder les multiples facettes et configurations de la consommation d’énergie à Porto Rico et ailleurs — depuis le marché à terme pétrolier, ou les sociétés transnationales détentrices de la dette obligataire de l’Agence nationale d’électricité portoricaine, jusqu’aux consommateurs locaux qui subissent les conséquences de cette mauvaise gestion fiscale d’une agence nationale de l’électricité désormais en faillite. Les expériences électromagnétiques d’Allora & Calzadilla sont à la fois une exploration de principes formels et une façon pour les artistes de se confronter à l’entrelacs complexe que constitue le réseau de distribution de l’énergie.

Michelle White, conservatrice en chef de la Menil Collection de Houston, où les deux artistes, acclamés par la critique, ont présenté en 2020/21 leur solo Specters of Noon, souligne dans le catalogue de cette exposition le positionnement artistique singulier d’Allora & Calzadilla : « Depuis le début de leur collaboration en 1995, ce duo d’artistes explore la manière dont les inégalités socio-économiques de notre temps entrent en collision avec le monde naturel, avec toutes ses merveilles et ses phénomènes de plus en plus plus effrayants et écrasants. Ils se délectent de cette interaction à la fois discordante et éclairante, véritable théâtre d’exploration d’un improbable réseau de relation, et déclencheur de conversations révélatrices. Nourries de substances, de matières et de sons tirés de contextes, d’histoires ou de sites particuliers, ces œuvres déplacent le spectateur à travers une diversité extrêmement disparate de terrains temporels, matériels, politiques et théoriques (4).»

(1) Le mot Antille trouve son origine dans la période précédant la colonisation européenne des Amériques, Antilia étant l’une de ces terres mystérieuses qui figuraient sur les cartes médiévales, tantôt comme un archipel, tantôt comme une terre continue de plus ou moins grande étendue, dont l’emplacement fluctuait au milieu de l’océan.
(2) Breton décrit la forêt d’Absalon en des termes évoquant également ces fluctuations de lumière que l’on retrouve dans Penumbra : «l’enchevêtrement de ces arbres spécialisés dans la voltige, qui se font la courte échelle jusqu’aux nuages, sautent des précipices et décrivent en geignant l’arc des sorcières chéries sous des ventouses de fleurs gluantes» [« Dialogue créole » in Martinique charmeuse de serpents, p.28]. André Masson réalisa une série de dessins inspirés de ces paysages martiniquais, dont certains figurent dans ce « Dialogue créole » avec André Breton, dans Martinique charmeuse de serpents [1948]. La vallée du gouffre d’Absalon, en Martinique, a en partie servi d’inspiration au chef-d’œuvre de Wifredo Lam, La Jungle [1943]. Bien qu’étant né et ayant grandi à Cuba, la découverte d’Absalon fut la première incursion de cet artiste dans une forêt tropicale. Par la suite, dans Tristes Tropiques [1955], Claude Levi-Strauss écrira lui aussi sur sa traversée de l’Atlantique et son séjour en Martinique.
(3) N.d.T. Graft signifie « Greffe » en français.
(4) White Michelle et al., Allora & Calzadilla : Specters of Noon, The Menil Collection, 26 septembre 2020 — 20 juin 2021 [Catalogue], The Menil Collection, Houston, États-Unis.

Allora & Calzadilla, Antille, exhibition view, Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris (2022). Courtesy of the artists and Galerie Chantal Crousel. Photo: Martin Argyroglo


more to explore:

 
 

By using GalleriesNow.net you agree to our use of cookies to enhance your experience. Close